Season 3 is coming soon!

Gold colored condenser microphone other black background. Sound recording equipment.

Season 3 of Victor E History is out next week and we’ll debut our brand new theme song, composed by Fort Hays State University student Nathan Weis. This season we will chat with notable alumni and will continue to feature student research on topics like the Sleepy Lagoon Murder, las Pachucas, the 1917 intelligence tests, Japanese video games, the gay rights movement, Edythe Eyde, and more!

In the meantime, catch up on seasons 1 and 2 on  Apple Podcasts, SpotifyAmazon Music, or any of the major podcast platforms. Make sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode.

S2- Episode 7 “Patent Medicines in the West” with Erin Adams

In this episode, graduate student Erin Adams joins Hollie Marquess to discuss the sale of patent medicines in the west and how they used Native American imagery to sell their potions. They also discuss how the Great British Bake Off relates to Turner’s theory of the West. 

You can find this episode on Apple Podcasts, SpotifyAmazon Music, or any of the major podcast platforms. Make sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode.

Selected Bibliography:

Primary Sources:

Adams, Samuel Hopkins. “If It’s Medical, It’s a Swindle.” New York Tribune. January 6, 1915, 74 edition, sec. 24,888. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1915-01-06/ed-1/seq-1/.

Louden’s Indian Expectorant. , ca. 1848. Photograph.

https://www.loc.gov/item/2001701409/.

Glackens, L. M. , Artist. The Indian Medicine Show / L.M. Glackens. N.Y.: Published by Keppler & Schwarzmann, Puck Building, November 2. Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2011647635/>.

“Kickapoo Indian Sagwa: Blood, Liver, Stomach and Kidney Renovator.” National Museum of American History. Accessed 2020. https://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_1296185.

Secondary Sources:

Burns, Stanley B., and Elizabeth A. Burns. “Wizard Oil patent medicine salesmen. (A Pictorial History of Healing).” Clinician Reviews, July 2002, 43. Gale Academic OneFile (accessed Spring, 2020). https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A90248517/AONE?u=klnb_fhsuniv&sid=AONE&xid=e7f78c7c

Biron, Gerry. “Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) participation in 19th century medicine shows.” Whispering Wind, August-September 2013, 6+. Gale Academic OneFile. https://link-gale-com.ezproxy.fhsu.edu/apps/doc/A347521927/AONE?u=klnb_fhsuniv&sid=AONE&xid=8dfc0ca3.

Rosenberg, John. 2012. “Barbarian Virtues in a Bottle: Patent Indian Medicines and the Commodification of Primitivism in the United States, 1870-1900.” Gender & History 24 (2): 368–88. doi:10.1111/j.1468-0424.2012.01687.x.

Are you interested in a history degree? We have online and on campus B.A. programs and we also have online and on campus M.A. programs in history or public history. Learn more at https://www.fhsu.edu/history/academic-programs/

S2-Episode 6 “The Fall of Nicholas II” with Miranda Edwards

In this episode, online Master’s student Miranda Edwards joins Dr. Manamee Guha to talk more about Nicholas II and World War I. How much did his autocratic ideals clash with revolutionaries who were looking for large-scale reforms? Miranda also discusses the role Nicholas II’s wife Alexandra Feodorovna  and her ally Rasputin played in pushing Russia into the throes of World War I.

You can find this episode on Apple Podcasts, SpotifyAmazon Music, or any of the major podcast platforms. Make sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode.

Selected Bibliography:

Gilliard, Pierre. Thirteen Years at the Russian Court. Translated by F. Appleby Holt. New York, NY: George H. Doran & Co., 1987. 

Massie, Robert K. Nicholas and Alexandra. New York, NY: Atheneum, 1968.   

Price, Morgan Philips. Dispatches from the Revolution: Russia, 1916-1918. Edited by Tania Rose. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1998. 

Radzinsky, Edvard. The Last Tsar: The Life and Death of Nicholas II. Translated by Marian Schwartz. New York, NY: Doubleday, 1992.

Romanov, Alexandra, Nicholas II Romanov, and Bernard Pares. Letters of the Tsaritsa to the Tsar, 1914-1916. Westport, CT: Hyperion, 1987.

Service, Robert. The Last of the Tsars: Nicholas II and the Russian Revolution. London: Macmillan, 2017.

Are you interested in a history degree? We have online and on campus B.A. programs and we also have online and on campus M.A. programs in history or public history. Learn more at https://www.fhsu.edu/history/academic-programs/

S2, Episode 5- “Communism and Cartoons” with Shelby Oshel

“Communism and Cartoons: Understanding Themes of Gender and Nationalism in Soviet Animations”

Cheburashka” by pop★ is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

In this episode, Hollie Marquess is joined by senior history major Shelby Oshel to discuss Soviet animation through the lens of gender and nationalism. Shelby traces Soviet animated cartoons and films from their infancy through the collapse of the Soviet Union.

You can find this episode on Apple Podcasts, SpotifyAmazon Music, or any of the major podcast platforms. Make sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode.

A selection of Soviet animation:

Almalrik, Leonid. Black and White. Soyuzmultfilm Services, 1932.

Kossovsky, M. War Chronicles. Soyuzmultfilm, 1939. https://youtu.be/5lCfRGJWo8U.

Uspensky, Eduard. “Gena the Crocodile.” Cheburashka, January 1, 1969.

———. “Cheburashka.” Cheburashka, January 1, 1971.

———. “Shapoklyak.” Cheburashka, January 1, 1974.

———. “Cheburashka Goes to School.” Cheburashka, October 8, 1983.

In addition to her research on Soviet animation, Shelby briefly mentions her current research project, which is to locate the unmarked graves of two sex workers from Hays City’s Wild West days. For more on Hays City prostitution and mentions of these two particular women, see:

“The Frontier Demimonde: Prostitution in Early Hays City, 1867-1883”

Are you interested in a history degree? We have online and on campus B.A. programs and we also have online and on campus M.A. programs in history or public history. Learn more at https://www.fhsu.edu/history/academic-programs/

S2, Episode 4-“Women’s Roles in Food Preparation in the Holodomor” with Alissa Zajac

Season 2 Episode 4

Memorial ‘the Holodomor’; 1932-1933 (death by hunger) in Kyiv, Ukraine” by Andrew J.Swan is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

In the years 1932-1933, Ukraine suffered a famine that historians estimate killed over four million Ukrainians. As a result of the famine, women had to come up with different survival strategies and methods for procuring and preparing food for themselves and their families. Senior history major Alissa Zajac joins Hollie Marquess to discuss women’s roles in food procurement and preparation during the Holodomor.

You can find this episode on Apple Podcasts, SpotifyAmazon Music, or any of the major podcast platforms. Make sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode.

Selected Bibliography:

Bohdan Klid, and Alexander J. Motyl. The Holodomor Reader: A Sourcebook on the Famine of 1932-1933 in Ukraine. Toronto: CIUS Press, 2012.

Borysenko, Valentyna. A Candle in Remembrance: An Oral History of the Ukrainian Genocide of 1932-1933. New York: Ukrainian Nation Women’s League of America, 2010.

Applebaum, Anne. Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine. New York: Doubleday, 2017.

Kis, Oksana. “Defying Death: Women’s Experience of the Holodomor, 1932-1933.” Aspasia 7, no. 1 (January 1, 2013).

Kis, Oksana. “Women’s Experience of the Holodomor: Challenges and Ambiguities of Motherhood.” Journal of Genocide Research 23, no. 4 (October 2, 2021): 527–46. 

S2, Episode 3 -“British Christianity and Opium in the Formation of the Oriental Other” with Drew Legere

In this episode Dr. Manamee Guha is joined by Drew Legere, a Junior at Fort Hays State University to discuss her research project on the tense relationship between the British and the Chinese leading up to the Opium Wars. As the British involved themselves in the opium trade, which brought British controlled Indian opium to China, both the opium merchants and Christian missionaries argued in support of the opium wars. Religious arguments were used by both groups to emphasize the importance of a British connection to China. For British opium merchants, demonizing the Chinese through their heathenism allowed the merchants to ignore the negative impact of the opium trade since the Chinese lack this vital British quality. Christian missionaries supported the opium wars to expand Christian influences on China, but later view the opium trade as a barrier to conversion which they viewed as a necessity for Chinese betterment.

You can find this episode on Apple Podcasts, SpotifyAmazon Music, or any of the major podcast platforms. Make sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode.

 Suggested Reading: 

Berridge, Virginia and Edwards, Griffith. Opium and the People: Opiate Use in Nineteenth-century England. London and New York, NY: Allen Lane and St. Martin’s Press, 1981

Derks, Hans. History of the Opium Problem the Assaulton the East, Ca. 1600 – 1950. Leiden: Brill, 2012

Mason, Mary Gertrude. Western Concepts of China and the Chinese,1840-1876. New York, NY,1939

Milligan, Barry. Pleasures and Pains: Opium and the Orient in Nineteenth-Century British Culture. Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia, 1995

Said, Edward. Orientalism, New York, NY: Vintage Books, 1979

Paquette, Jean “An Uncompromising Land; the London Missionary Society in China, 1807-1860,” PhD Diss., University of California, 1987.

Are you interested in a history degree? We have online and on campus B.A. programs and we also have online and on campus M.A. programs in history or public history. Learn more at https://www.fhsu.edu/history/academic-programs/

S2, Episode 2- “Nursing Under Fire” with Lizz Dobmeyer

Red Cross Nurse” by east_lothian_museums is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

In this episode, Lizz Dobmeyer, a master’s student in the FHSU History Department online, joins Hollie to discuss “Nursing Under Fire: The Experiences and Achievements of World War I Allied Nurses on the Western Front.”

You can find this episode on Apple Podcasts, SpotifyAmazon Music, or any of the major podcast platforms. Make sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode.

Selected Bibliography:

Powell, Anne. Women in the War Zone: Hospital Service in the First World War. Stroud: The History Press, 2013.

Hallett, Christine E. Containing Trauma: Nursing Work in the First World War. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2011.

Hallett, Christine E. Veiled Warriors: Allied Nurses of the First World War. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021.

Harris, Kirsty. More than Bombs and Bandages: Australian Army Nurses at Work in World War I. Newport: Big Sky Publishing Pty, Limited, 2016.

Moore, Wendy. No Man’s Land the Trailblazing Women Who Ran Britain’s Most Extraordinary Military Hospital during World War I. New York, NY: Basic Books, 2020.

Are you interested in a history degree? We have online and on campus B.A. programs and we also have online and on campus M.A. programs in history or public history. Learn more at https://www.fhsu.edu/history/academic-programs/

Season 2, Episode 1- “Spring Break 2023, Trip to Poland”

With Dr. Amber Nickell and Ms. Hollie Marquess

In our first episode of Season 2, Dr. Manamee Guha visits with Amber Nickell and Hollie Marquess about their upcoming study abroad opportunity for FHSU students in Poland.

You can find this episode on Apple Podcasts, SpotifyAmazon Music, or any of the major podcast platforms. Make sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode. We have so many exciting topics to discuss in Season 2!

For more on opportunities from the History Department at Fort Hays State University, visit www.fhsu.edu/history

Episode 9 “The Italian Mafia and Butch Lesbian Partnership in Greenwich Village” with Alison Helget

Buddy Kent (left) and Anna Genovese (right)

In our final episode of season one, FHSU graduate student in history, Alison Helget, joins Hollie Marquess to discuss her master’s thesis “‘You Wanna Play Rough?’: The Italian Mafia and Butch Lesbian Partnership in Greenwich Village, 1945-1968.”

You can find this episode on Apple Podcasts, SpotifyAmazon Music, or any of the major podcast platforms. Make sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode.

Selected Bibliography:

Breckinridge, Sophonisba. New Homes for Old. New York: Harper, 1921.

Chapin, Anna Alice. Greenwich Village. New York: Dood, Mead and Company, 1920.

Lanzillotto, Annie Rachele. L Is for Lion: An Italian Bronx Butch Freedom Memoir. New York: The State University of New York, Excelsior Editions, 2013.

Chauncey, George. Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940. New York: Basic Books, 1995.

Crawford, Phillip Jr. The Mafia and the Gays. Scotts Valley, CA: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2015.

Underwood, Lisa. The Drag Queen Anthology: The Absolutely Fabulous but Flawlessly Customary World of Female Impersonators. Abingdon-on-Thames, United Kingdom: Taylor and Francis Group, 2004.

Wetzsteon, Ross. Republic of Dreams: Greenwich Village: The American Bohemia, 1910-1960. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2003.

Are you interested in a history degree? We have online and on campus B.A. programs and we also have online and on campus M.A. programs in history or public history. Learn more at https://www.fhsu.edu/history/academic-programs/

Episode 8- “Fight for the West: Black Cowboys and the Rodeo” with Colton Wagner

Myrtis Dightman, the first African American cowboy to ride in the National Finals Rodeo

Colton Wager, graduate student in the on-campus M.A. in History program at Fort Hays State University, and member of the FHSU Rodeo Team, discusses a history of African Americans in the West, African American rodeo in the Jim Crow era, and finally, the inclusion of African Americans into professional Rodeo.

You can find this episode on Apple Podcasts, SpotifyAmazon Music, or any of the major podcast platforms. Make sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode.

Selected Bibliography:

Cartwright, Keith Ryan. Black Cowboys of Rodeo: Unsung Heroes from Harlem to Hollywood and the American West. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2021.

Flamming, Douglas. African Americans in the West. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2009.

Patton, Tracy Owens and Sally M. Schedlock. “Let’s Go, Let’s Show, Let’s Rodeo: African Americans and the History of Rodeo.” The Journal of African American History 96, no. 4 (2011): 503-521.

________. Gender, Whiteness, and Power in Rodeo: Breaking Away from the Ties of Sexism and Racism. Plymouth: Lexington Books, 2012.

Wallace, Christian. “The Jackie Robinson of Rodeo,” Texas Monthly, July, 2018.

Wills, Matthew. “Black Cowboys and the History of the Rodeo,” JSTOR Daily, February 11, 2021, https://daily.jstor.org/black-cowboys-and-the-history-of-the-rodeo/.

Are you interested in a history degree? We have online and on campus B.A. programs and we also have online and on campus M.A. programs in history or public history. Learn more at https://www.fhsu.edu/history/academic-programs/

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